You are here

Enhancing urban infrastructure investment planning practices for a changing climate

TitleEnhancing urban infrastructure investment planning practices for a changing climate
Publication TypeManual Entry
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsHe, J., C. Valeo, and F. J. - C. Bouchart
WATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Volume53
Pagination13-20
PublisherIWA
Place PublishedALLIANCE HOUSE, 12 CAXTON ST, LONDON SW1H0QS, ENGLAND
Type of ArticleArticle; Proceedings Paper
ISSN0273-1223
CLIMATE CHANGE, design storm, intensity-duration-frequency curves, urban water infrastructure
Abstract

Climate change raises many concerns for urban water management because of the effects on all aspects of the hydrological cycle. Urban water infrastructure has traditionally been designed using historical observations and assuming stationary climatic conditions. The capability of this infrastructure, whether for storm-water drainage, or water supply, may be over- or under-designed for future climatic conditions. In particular, changes in the frequency and intensity of extreme rainfall events will have the most acute effect on storm-water drainage systems. Therefore, it is necessary to take future climatic conditions into consideration in engineering designs in order to enhance water infrastructure investment planning practices in a long time horizon. This paper provides the initial results of a study that is examining ways to enhance urban infrastructure investment planning practices against changes in hydrologic regimes for a changing climate. Design storms and intensity-duration-frequency curves that are used in the engineering design of storm-water drainage systems are developed under future climatic conditions by empirically adjusting the general circulation model output, and using the Gumbel distribution and the Chicago method. Simulations are then performed on an existing storm-water drainage system from NE Calgary to investigate the resiliency of the system under climate change.

DOI10.2166/wst.2006.292
Citation Key1127
Access
Community Notes

Methods are presented for using GCM results with station data to create new storm intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves for hydrological planning.